Haunt Movies to Get You in the Halloween Mood

Haunted houses are kind of a thing in my family. My mom, my brother, and myself have all worked in one, at some point. That’s where my best friend and I became friends, many years ago. I love Halloween events like Halloween Horror Nights at Universal Orlando. I’ve been a scareactor, makeup artist, and worked on sets. I’ve been behind the scenes at some of the coolest haunts I’ve ever been to. And now, I’ve passed along my love for haunts to my nieces, who have become my haunt buddies the last two years. (Each girl pictured above at their first house they ever went through.)

With everything this year, it’s looking like the girls and I may be skipping out on haunts. So, to keep the feeling alive, I’ve been binge-watching some movies in one of my favorite sub genres of horror: haunt attractions going awry.

So, I decided to share a list with some of my favorites. I’m always finding more to watch, so not everything is on here that could be, I’m sure. But hopefully you’ll find some spooky haunt movies to keep the spirit alive if you are also missing haunts this year.

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For the Love of Horror

I, myself, am strange and unusual.” – Lydia Deetz (Beetlejuice)

For as long as I can remember, I’ve loved monsters. My mom proudly tells people the stories: I cut teeth watching the Universal Monsters, I had a treasured Wolfman I carried around named Wolfy. One of her favorite stories involves me sitting outside with a black pot making “potions” while our new neighbors moved in. I idolized Elvira instead of pop stars. I grew up with a special place in my heart for Frankenstein’s monster and hunted for ghosts. The same year I got my first cellphone, I got my first Ouija board. It’s safe to say I started out a weirdo.

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The Lady From the Black Lagoon

“In 1954, movie-going audiences were shocked and awed by Universal Studio’s groundbreaking horror film Creature from the Black Lagoon. As the years passed, the film gained a reputation as a landmark of the monster-movie genre. But only a small number of devotees were aware of the existence of Milicent Patrick who remains, to this day, the only woman to have designed a classic Universal monster.

That is, until film producer, horror-aficionado, and Black Lagoon acolyte, Mallory O’Meara begins to investigate rumors about the monster’s creator only to find more questions than answers. Through diligent research, O’Meara learns that the enigmatic artist led a rich and fascinating life that intersects with some of the largest figures of mid-century America, including William Randolph Hearst and Walt Disney.

The sudden, premature end to Patrick’s career is defined by circumstances that parallel—uncomfortably so—O’Meara’s own experiences in the film world, an industry that continues to be dominated by men. In a narrative with equal parts mystery and biography, The Lady from the Black Lagoon interweaves the lives of two women separated by decades but bound together by the tragedies and triumphs of working in Hollywood.”

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