Harley Quinn – Episode One, “Til Death Do Us Part”

DC Universe released the first episode of the Harley Quinn cartoon, based around the idea of Harley breaking up with the Clown Prince of Crime and deciding to go off on her own and become the big villain in town, herself.

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Anime Themed Night with Kids

So, my nieces have really gotten into anime, lately. Their favorites are My Hero Academia, InuYasha, and Tokyo Ghoul.

Since I’ve been a bit under the weather (thanks, Trigeminal Neuralgia flare), I thought we deserved a fun themed night, and something relatively easy for me to do, given how awful I feel.

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Hazbin Hotel

Hazbin Hotel is the story of Charlie, the princess of Hell, as she pursues her seemingly impossible goal of rehabilitating demons to peacefully reduce overpopulation in her kingdom. She opens a hotel in hopes that patients will be “checking out” into Heaven. While most of Hell mocks her goal, her devoted partner Vaggie, and their first test subject, adult film-star Angel Dust, stick by her side. When a powerful entity known as the “Radio Demon” reaches out to Charlie to assist in her endeavors, her crazy dream is given a chance to become a reality.

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The Lady From the Black Lagoon

“In 1954, movie-going audiences were shocked and awed by Universal Studio’s groundbreaking horror film Creature from the Black Lagoon. As the years passed, the film gained a reputation as a landmark of the monster-movie genre. But only a small number of devotees were aware of the existence of Milicent Patrick who remains, to this day, the only woman to have designed a classic Universal monster.

That is, until film producer, horror-aficionado, and Black Lagoon acolyte, Mallory O’Meara begins to investigate rumors about the monster’s creator only to find more questions than answers. Through diligent research, O’Meara learns that the enigmatic artist led a rich and fascinating life that intersects with some of the largest figures of mid-century America, including William Randolph Hearst and Walt Disney.

The sudden, premature end to Patrick’s career is defined by circumstances that parallel—uncomfortably so—O’Meara’s own experiences in the film world, an industry that continues to be dominated by men. In a narrative with equal parts mystery and biography, The Lady from the Black Lagoon interweaves the lives of two women separated by decades but bound together by the tragedies and triumphs of working in Hollywood.”

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